Monthly Archives: February 2015

Minister Fast to Make Important Announcement on Corporate Social ...

February 28, 2015 – The Honourable Ed Fast, Minister of International Trade, will make an important announcement, related to the Government of Canada’s enhanced corporate social responsibility strategy, on March 1, 2015, in Toronto, Ontario, on the margins of the Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada annual convention.
Event: Remarks (open to media), photo opportunity and media availabilityDate: Sunday, March 1, 2015Time: 11 a.m. ETLocation: Metro Toronto Convention Centre – South Building, Room 712, 222 Bremner Boulevard, Toronto, Ontario
For more information, please contact:
Max MoncasterPress SecretaryOffice of the Honourable Ed FastMinister of International Trade343-203-7332
Media Relations OfficeForeign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada343-203-7700media@international.gc.caFollow us on Twitter: @Canada_TradeLike us on Facebook: Canada’s International Trade Plan-DFATD

Minister Rickford Announces Media Availabilities at PDAC ...

TORONTO — The Honourable Greg Rickford, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor), will attend the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada’s (PDAC) International Convention, Trade Show & Investors Exchange on Sunday, March 1, 2015, and Monday, March 2, 2015.
Sunday, March 1:
Minister Rickford and the Honourable Michael Gravelle, Ontario Minister of Northern Development and Mines, will make an announcement supporting economic opportunities for Northwestern Ontario (speech and photo opportunity).
Location: Metro Toronto Convention Centre — North BuildingRoom 104DC255 Front Street WestToronto, OntarioTime: 1:30 p.m. EST
Please Note: Media not registered to attend the PDAC convention are asked to report to the main registration desk at least 15 minutes prior to the start of the news conference.
Minister Rickford will participate in a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the FedNor booth (photo opportunity).
Location: Metro Toronto Convention Centre — North BuildingNorthern Ontario Mining Showcase (Booth 6501)255 Front Street WestToronto, OntarioTime: 3:00 p.m. EST
Minister Rickford will tour the trade show floor (photo opportunity).
Location: Metro Toronto Convention Centre — South BuildingIn front of PDAC Media Centre, Room 709222 Bremner BlvdToronto, OntarioTime: 4:00 p.m. EST
Minister Rickford and the Honourable Joe Oliver, Canada’s Minister of Finance, will deliver keynote remarks at the Media Reception and make an important announcement.
Location:   Fairmont Royal York Hotel – Imperial Room100 Front Street WestToronto, OntarioTime: 6:00 p.m. EST
Monday, March 2:
Minister Rickford will deliver remarks at the PDAC Opening Ceremony (speech and photo opportunity).
Location:   Metro Toronto Convention Centre — North BuildingJohn Bassett Theatre255 Front Street WestToronto, OntarioTime: 8:30 a.m. EST
Minister Rickford will be available to media following the ceremony.
Location: Metro Toronto Convention Centre — North BuildingWarm-Up Room (backstage of John Bassett Theatre)255 Front Street WestToronto, OntarioTime: 9:30 a.m. EST
Please note: PDAC media accreditation required to attend all events.
Media may contact:
Chris McCluskeyCommunications DirectorOffice of Canada’s MinisterNatural Resources Canada613-996-2007
Media RelationsNatural Resources CanadaOttawa613-992-4447
Follow us on Twitter: @NRCan (http://twitter.com/nrcan)

Trade and Industry on furniture design competition

Western Cape student wins furniture design competition

Jess Kuhlenthal, an Industrial Design student at the Cape Peninsula University has scooped first prize in the inaugural National Furniture Design Competition organised by the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti), in partnership with the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS), Design Institute, Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and Furntech. The department announced the winner of the competition at the Design Indaba Expo in Cape Town.

the dti supported student finalists of the 2014 Furniture Design Competition to showcase their furniture designs at the Design Indaba Expo to be held at the Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC) from 27 February-1 March 2015.

Kuhlenthal, a fourth year student, will receive a set of designing tools worth R10 000 for a Trimod table that consists of three right-angled triangles which she designed. She expressed contentment for being chosen as the best designer. She said she was inspired by creating a product that is more functional and can be trusted by clients.

“Being the winner presents me with an opportunity to be recognised as an upcoming designer. I’m confident that this design is going to take me places as it is impressive and has captured the imagination of the panel of judges,” declared Kuhlenthal.

Kuhlenthal said she planned to study for her Masters’ degree in Industrial Design, travel all over the world to get experience and come back to South Africa and implement her experiences.

According to the Chief Director of Agro-processing at the dti, Ms Unati Speirs, the furniture industry is an important sector in the South African economy.

“The industry has a potential to contribute to the reduction of unemployment, increase exports and develop the Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs).

The competition is designed in such a way that it should promote entrepreneurs in furniture designing to assist them take their career forward and improve the design skills,” said Speirs.

The Head of the Design Institute and Innovation of the SABS, Mr Gavin Mageni said South Africa was experiencing an influx of imported finished furniture. He suggested that more efforts like the competition be put in place, in an attempt to create an enabling environment for entrepreneurs to explore the raw materials and produce products that will be internationally competitive.

Mageni added that that South Africans need to start responding to the Industrial Policy Action Plan that makes reference to the shortage of high-level skills in the furniture industry such as design.

This, according to Mageni limits South African furniture manufacturers’ capacity to supply world-class products in line with both domestic and global market demand, and thus negatively affecting the industry’s competitiveness.

Enquiries:

Sidwell Medupe-Departmental Spokesperson

Tel: (012) 394 1650

Mobile: 079 492 1774

E-mail: MSMedupe@thedti.gov.za

SOURCE: SOUTH AFRICAN OFFICIAL NEWS

President Jacob Zuma: Launch of Warriors Walk for Cancer Initiative

Address by President Jacob G Zuma at the launch of the 1st annual Warriors Walk for Cancer Initiative by the Tobeka Madiba Zuma Foundation, Union Buildings, Tshwane

Ministers,

Deputy Ministers,

TMZ Foundation Board,

Distinguished guests.

I greet you warmly.

I am pleased to join you on this important occasion. You have all gathered here because you regard the good health and well-being of women in our country as being of great importance.

Cancer is emerging as one of the major public health problems not only in our country but in Africa a whole. Breast cancer in particular, affects scores of women in our country, and requires our utmost attention.

We have to mobilize much of our resources as a collective to ensure that we eradicate breast and cervical cancer. Government, through the Department of Health, is already doing this.

One of the important interventions is ensuring that our women have equitable access to quality healthcare. Crucial is ensuring that women are diagnosed early enough to save their lives. Beyond government, civil society initiatives are also helpful in raising awareness and providing support to women.

The TMZ Foundation’s Annual Warriors Walk for Cancer contributes to this important programme of raising awareness about cancer. For most families, the walk is about more than just raising money for raising awareness.

The walk is to honour a loved one lost to the disease, to celebrate another who survived and to support those who continue to fight against it. The significance of this gesture is that this Walk will provide a platform to talk to women and disseminate information but also inform them about the right lifestyle choices.

Ladies and gentlemen,

The rates of breast and cervical cancer in the developing countries are rapidly increasing due to the impact of risk factors associated with changing lifestyles. And most cancers, including breast and cervical cancer are attributable to lifestyle: obesity, smoking, alcohol.

Whilst Government is the custodian of its own people and has a responsibility to provide services, our people must also take responsibility for their health too.

In other words, we cannot act irresponsibly and smoke, drink alcohol, not exercise and put on excess weight. If we do so, we place our lives at risk for the early onset of these non- communicable diseases so largely preventable.

The citizens need to meet government half way in its attempt to strengthen preventive measures. As the old saying goes “Prevention is better than cure”.

Since 2009, we worked tirelessly to ensure that among non-communicable diseases, cancer and other non-communicable diseases featured prominently on the agenda of the UN General Assembly Development Summit on MDGs in September 2010 as well as the UN High Level Summit on NCDs held September 2011.

I have no doubt in my mind that after attending the UN High Level Summit in 2011, not a single Head of State from Member States left New York not clear about the importance of prioritising the fight against non-communicable diseases.

After that meeting, as Heads of State, we still had a major task of ensuring that those undertakings made during the Summit are implemented in our respective countries. Let us remember that cancer is not about statistics, it is about people, families, and communities. It is about our loved ones.

The women in Africa suffer in many cases from non-responsive health services but perhaps what is more disturbing is the fear and stigma associated with cancer. Women suffer from being discriminated against by their communities, ostracized by their partners or husbands and painful deaths from cancer. Cultural barriers and taboo about surgery especially of the breast.

Our Government seeks to continue forming strategic alliances with the relevant stakeholders so as to move through the breadth and width of South Africa.

Also of great significance is ensuring that women’s cancers are not seen in isolation but dovetailed with other existing services such child care, HIV and the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. We therefore need a close working relationship with civil society, business, government, traditional healers and faith based organisations.

We support this integrated approach as government because we want to go beyond just the health care aspect, but to include the social aspects because social determinants play a significant role in health outcomes.

My wish is to see us all come together to support and empower each other. South Africans – and South African women in particular – have a generosity of spirit that I am yet to feel anywhere else in the world.

If we all extend our hands to help one another we can overcome all the challenges that face us. We are a nation that thrives when we come together and support the same goal.

I know that the fight against cancer will succeed if we work together and make it everybody’s business in our communities. I wish the TMZ foundation and all organisations involved in the fight against cancer well as they take this important fight forward.

I thank you!

SOURCE: SOUTH AFRICAN OFFICIAL NEWS

Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa unveils second MeerKAT antenna

Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa and the Minister of Science and Technology, Naledi Pandor on Saturday (28 February), unveiled the second of 64 MeerKAT antennas.

The South African MeerKAT radio telescope, currently being built outside Carnarvon in Northern Cape, is a precursor to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope, to be built in South Africa and in Australia and will be integrated into the SKA during the first phase of construction.

“It is particularly significant that eight other African countries will be involved in hosting the second phase of the project. This promises to establish Africa as a hub for expanding scientific inquiry,” said the Deputy President.

The event was attended by Ministers from the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Committee, Northern Cape Premier, Sylvia Lucas, local mayors, community members and ambassadors and high commissioners from Germany, Portugal, China, Zambia and Mozambique.

In appreciating the broader benefits of this project to South Africa, government has identified the construction of the SKA as a strategic infrastructure project overseen by the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Committee.

During the visit, Deputy President Ramaphosa welcomed the huge benefit brought by the hosting the SKA and urged South Africans to take full advantage of this huge project.

“The 699 students and postdoctoral fellows that have been supported through the SKA South Africa bursary and fellowship programme are at the forefront of this effort. This project is developing technical and artisan skills while producing a new cohort of young scientists”, said the Deputy President.

The Deputy President described the project as significant to alleviate poverty and improve the lives of people. “The SKA forms part of efforts to transform South Africa’s economy through human capital development, innovation, value addition, industrialisation and entrepreneurship. It will create jobs not only during the next decade or so of construction, but also for the next 50 years of operation and maintenance. Science and technology can do much in the fight against poverty, unemployment and inequality.”

Mr Ramaphosa said the project is developing technical and artisan skills while producing a new cohort of young scientists. “Scientists are not born. They are made. They are the products of a society that values knowledge, promotes learning and rewards innovation. They are products of a society that reads, of schools that work and parents that are engaged in the intellectual development of their children.”

The Deputy President also commended Dr Bennie Fanaroff, Director of SKA Project South Africa and the Minister and the former Ministers of Science and Technology for their sterling work in the development of the SKA project. Second dish was named in honour of Dr Fanaroff.

Minister of Science and Technology, Naledi Pandor vowed that SKA project will meet its deadlines. “By the end of 2016 they will have 64 dishes of the MeerKAT ready for commissioning and by 2017 the telescope will be ready to do science.”

“We are proud that, even before the MeerKAT has been completed, five years of observing time on it have already been allocated to more than 500 radio astronomers, 85 of them from Africa. It demonstrates massive confidence in South Africa’s scientific infrastructure, in which the Department of Science and Technology continues to invest.”

The SKA will address fundamental unanswered questions about our Universe including how the first stars and galaxies formed after the Big Bang, how galaxies have evolved since then, the role of magnetism in the cosmos, the nature of gravity, the search for life beyond Earth.

Enquiries:

Ronnie Mamoepa

Cell: 082 990 4853

Lunga Ngqengelele

Tel: 012 843 6799

Cell: 082 566 0446

David Mandaha

Cell: 072 126 8910

E-mail: david.mandaha@dst.gov.za

Lorenzo Raynard (SKA Communication Manager)

Cell: 071 454 0658

SOURCE: SOUTH AFRICAN OFFICIAL NEWS

Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa: Remarks during visit to Square ...

Address by Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa on the occasion of his visit to the site of the Square Kilometre Array Carnarvon, Northern Cape

Minister of Science and Technology, Ms Naledi Pandor,

Cabinet Colleagues and Deputy Ministers,

Premier of the Northern Cape, Ms Sylvia Lucas,

Minister of Infrastructure, Science and Technology of Botswana, Mr Nonofo Molefhi,

Ambassadors, High Commissioners and Consuls-General,

Ladies and gentlemen.

It is a great pleasure to be with you at the site of the Square Kilometre Array. For me, this project has long been a source of interest and fascination. I would like to commend Minister Pandor and her predecessors, Minister Derek Hanekom and Mosibudi Mangena, for having championed this project with such enthusiasm and determination.

I would also like to thank Dr Bernie Fanaroff for the exceptional contribution he has made as the SKA South Africa project director. I wish his successor, Dr Rob Adam, well in taking forward this critical work.

The Square Kilometre Array project is a truly global undertaking.

While the first phase of the SKA will be situated in South Africa and Australia, there are currently 11 countries that participate as members of the SKA Organisation. Around 100 organisations from about 20 countries have been participating in the design and development of the SKA.

It is particularly significant that eight other African countries will be involved in hosting the second phase of the project. This promises to establish Africa as a hub for expanding scientific inquiry.

The SKA project, which is aligned with the African Union’s 10-year Science, Technology and Innovation Strategy for Africa, will help drive human capital development on the continent.

It will contribute to Africa’s efforts to build innovation-led, knowledge-based economies. These efforts seek to harness science, technology and innovation to advance the continent’s developmental goals.

The SKA is unprecedented.

It is a global science and engineering project to build the world’s largest radio telescope.

The SKA will collect and process vast amounts of data. It will require and encourage significant advances in high-performance computing. Producing the thousands of dishes required for the SKA will demand an entirely new way of building highly sophisticated and sensitive scientific instruments.

It is anticipated that this will lead to new innovations in manufacturing and construction. In appreciating the broader benefits of this project to South Africa, government has identified the construction of the SKA as a strategic infrastructure project overseen by the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Committee.

The SKA forms part of efforts to transform South Africa’s economy through human capital development, innovation, value addition, industrialisation and entrepreneurship.

It will create jobs not only during the next decade or so of construction, but also for the next 50 years of operation and maintenance.

Ladies and gentlemen,

Science and technology can do much in the fight against poverty, unemployment and inequality. The National Development Plan highlights the vital role played by science, technology and innovation in national development and equitable growth.

Throughout human history, technological progress has fuelled economic and social development. From agriculture to commerce, from health care to communications, from manufacturing to education, technology has transformed the human experience.

In this respect, the SKA project is both a product and an enabler of technological progress. The SKA would not have been conceivable without the scientific advances made in recent decades. At the same time, it also lays the foundation for further advances.

It will both expand our knowledge and develop the human capital we need to become more innovative. The 699 students and postdoctoral fellows that have been supported through the SKA South Africa bursary and fellowship programme are at the forefront of this effort.

This project is developing technical and artisan skills while producing a new cohort of young scientists. Scientists are not born. They are made. They are the products of a society that values knowledge, promotes learning and rewards innovation.

They are products of a society that reads, of schools that work and parents that are engaged in the intellectual development of their children. We need universities that have the academic capacity and financial resources to conduct ground-breaking research.

We need companies that are prepared to dedicate resources to research and development, understanding that sustained profitability depends on innovative products and evolving ways of working.

We need schools that have libraries. We need schools that have capable and enthusiastic teachers of maths, science and language. We need to acknowledge that the scientists of tomorrow begin their development even before they are born.

The provision of quality antenatal care to pregnant women is just as important to scientific progress as advanced maths classes are. Adequate nutrition and access to health care in the first thousand days of life are just as important as funding for post-doctoral programmes.

Scientists are the product of a society that invests in its children and that cares for its youth.

Ladies and gentlemen,

The Square Kilometre Array will be a revolutionary new radio telescope. It will be a highly flexible instrument designed to address fundamental questions in astrophysics, fundamental physics, cosmology, particle astrophysics and astrobiology.

Through the SKA we will be able to probe the cosmic Dark Ages and previously unexplored parts of the distant universe.

We will use it to search for planets and black holes, and examine galaxy evolution, cosmology and dark energy, in search of answers to fundamental questions about our origins and how the universe works.

While the SKA will gaze at the sky, it remains deeply embedded in our soil and close to the lives of ordinary South Africans.

We commend, encourage and support partnerships between the SKA Project Office and the private sector that are transforming the lives of our communities in the Northern Cape.

We are witnesses to human capital development through a bursary programme for learners in the surrounding areas of Williston, Brandvlei, Van Wyksvlei and Carnarvon.

We welcome the initiative to upgrade the school hostel in Carnarvon, the support provided to emerging entrepreneurs, and the partnership between the SKA SA Project Office, Siyafunda, Cisco and Intel to establish a community knowledge centre for the people living in the area.

To remind us of the integral link between science and culture, I would encourage you to visit the Shared Sky art exhibition at the National Gallery in Cape Town. This exhibition brings together the work of indigenous South African and Australian artists with ancient cultural connections to the two sites where the SKA will be located.

The idea of a sky shared by all humanity is integral to the international science and engineering collaboration that is the SKA project. Science knows no borders. Knowledge is the preserve of no nation.

Let us work together to expand what we know and to apply what we discover to improve the condition of all life on this planet.

Let us work together to explore the history of our universe and, in doing so, secure our common future.

I thank you!

SOURCE: SOUTH AFRICAN OFFICIAL NEWS

Women in South Sudan turning "challenges into opportunities"

28 Feb 2015

Listen /
Women in South Sudan are turning the challenges they face on a daily basis into “opportunities.”
That’s according to UN Women which has been supporting peace efforts through women groups in the African country.
The organization has worked with a number of groups to develop a document known as the Women’s Agenda for Peace and Sustainable Development in South Sudan.
Susan Dokolo has been speaking to the UN Women Country Representative Izeduwa Derex-Briggs.
Duration: 1’54”

52nd IPRM meeting takes place in Ergneti

52nd IPRM meeting takes place in Ergneti
Ergneti, 27 February 2015 – The 52nd meeting under the Incident Prevention and Response Mechanism (IPRM) took place today in Ergneti, co-facilitated by Kęstutis Jankauskas, the Head of the EU Monitoring Mission in Georgia (EUMM), and Ambassador Angelo Gnaedinger, the Special Representative of the OSCE Chairperson-in-Office for the South Caucasus.
After reviewing the current security situation along the Administrative Boundary Line (ABL) the participants extensively discussed safety measures intended to avoid any misunderstandings regarding agricultural and other works as well as patrolling in the vicinity of the ABL. They also exchanged information concerning the situation of prisoners, including those on hunger strike, and missing persons. Problems caused by the installation of fences and other obstacles for the local communities were raised.
The co-facilitators again encouraged participants to continue using the Hotline especially with regards to events taking place in the vicinity of the ABL in order to avoid any misunderstandings.  
The next IPRM meeting will take place on the 25th March 2015.