Daily Archives: May 2, 2018

YPO Innovation Week Unites Global Innovators for Africa Ignite Event

Signature Event in Kenya Will Feature Cutting-Edge Insights from a Selection of Africa’s Most Innovative Thought and Business Leaders

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, May 02, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As part of its third annual YPO Innovation Week, YPO will host Africa Ignite in Nairobi, Kenya, convening more than 140 senior executives to discuss and brainstorm how technology is transforming business operations in Africa and around the world.

YPO Innovation Week is a series of more than 50 events conducted in over 30 countries throughout the world from 7-11 May 2018, featuring dynamic global innovators who will come together to share best-in-class business strategies as well as timely and relevant insights that are fueling innovation and shaping the future of global business over the next decade.

Through lectures, workshops and site visits, Africa Ignite will focus on the opportunities and challenges of doing business in Africa, while highlighting Africa’s spirit of innovation.

“Africa is a hotbed of innovation, as will be showcased throughout Africa Ignite 2018,” says YPO Africa Ignite Co-Champion Dhruv Pandit, CEO of Fedha Group. “YPO members from across Africa will share experiences with each other and learn from truly innovative businesses that are already disrupting the African landscape in a positive way.”

Featured speakers include:

  • Craig Wing, Partner of FutureWorld International
  • Rob Burnet, a two-time Emmy Award winning producer and founder and CEO of Well Told Story
  • Eric Hersman, Founder and CEO of BRCK and Founder of iHUB
  • Vishal Agarwal, Chairman and Chief Executive of Full Circle Africa and YPO member
  • Jon Foster-Pedley, Dean of the Henley Business School

Co-Champion Chirag Sanghrajka, Managing Director of Cape Holdings Ltd., adds, “The event sold out in record time, and we look forward to welcoming over 140 top CEOs from across Africa and beyond.”

YPO Innovation Week is a global event during which the world’s most innovative companies share their inspiration and insights. YPO Innovation Week is designed for YPO leaders who are responsible for vision, strategy, information and technology who are charged with driving innovation — across industries and sectors.

Through signature Innovation Week events, live two-way interactive video casts and livestream events, business leaders will learn how to keep pace with innovation trends on a global scale, innovate and disrupt industry practices, nurture and develop value-creating ideas across organizations and positively impact communities, industries and the world.

Additional Innovation Week signature events will be held between 7-11 May 2018 in major cities including Sydney, Australia; London, England; New York, New York, USA; Santa Domingo, Dominican Republic; and Silicon Valley, California, USA.

For more information, visit the YPO Innovation Week website.

ABOUT YPO

The premier leadership organization of chief executives in the world.

YPO is the global platform for chief executives to engage, learn and grow. YPO members harness the knowledge, influence and trust of the world’s most influential and innovative business leaders to inspire business, personal, family and community impact.

Today, YPO empowers more than 25,000 members in more than 130 countries, diversified among industries and types of businesses. Altogether, YPO member-run companies employ 16 million people and generate USD6 trillion in annual revenues.

Leadership. Learning. Lifelong. For more information, visit YPO.org.

Contact:
YPO
Linda Fisk
Office: +1 972 629 7305 (United States)
Mobile: +1 972 207 4298
press@ypo.org

President Cyril Ramaphosa addresses Japan-Africa Public Private ...

President Cyril Ramaphosa will tomorrow, Thursday, 3 May 2018, deliver the keynote address at the Japan-Africa Public Private Economic Forum at the Sandton Convention Centre, Johannesburg.

The Japan-Africa Public Private Economic Forum, hosted by South Africa, is organised by the government of Japan and the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) and is scheduled to take place from the 3rd to the 4th May 2018.

The Forum, to be attended by business executives and representatives of government from African countries and Japan, is held in Africa with a view to accelerate the promotion of private sector-led economic growth by encouraging networking among African and Japanese companies.

Furthermore, the Forum seeks to assist strengthen investment between Japan and Africa within the public and private sectors. The South African government is committed to initiate measures towards economic recovery and creating employment opportunities.

Source: Government of South Africa

President Cyril Ramaphosa addresses Japan-Africa Public Private ...

President Cyril Ramaphosa will tomorrow, Thursday, 3 May 2018, deliver the keynote address at the Japan-Africa Public Private Economic Forum at the Sandton Convention Centre, Johannesburg.

The Japan-Africa Public Private Economic Forum, hosted by South Africa, is organised by the government of Japan and the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) and is scheduled to take place from the 3rd to the 4th May 2018.

The Forum, to be attended by business executives and representatives of government from African countries and Japan, is held in Africa with a view to accelerate the promotion of private sector-led economic growth by encouraging networking among African and Japanese companies.

Furthermore, the Forum seeks to assist strengthen investment between Japan and Africa within the public and private sectors. The South African government is committed to initiate measures towards economic recovery and creating employment opportunities.

Source: Government of South Africa

Missing child sought by KwaMsane Police

KwaMsane police are appealing to the members of the community to assist in locating a missing baby, Asande Mhlongo (1 year and 8 months) from Emachibini area, KwaMsane. She was last seen on 29 April 2018 at about 05:30, playing with her siblings. She was wearing a blue jersey with white cartoons and a navy dress.

We are appealing to anyone with the information of her whereabouts to contact Sargent S Msweli on 082 6880734 or 035 551 9049. Our crime stop number can also be contacted on 08600 10111.

Source: South African Police Service

Remembering Albertina Sisulu

On 9 May, 1994, with the advent of democracy in South Africa, Albertina Sisulu stood up in Parliament to nominate Nelson Mandela for election as the first black President of the newly born country.

It was a historic moment that ushered a new era for the country. It’s most likely that many South African journalists, particularly the younger generation, became aware of Albertina Sisulu during that historic moment in the South African parliament.

But long before that 1994 breakthrough, Sisulu played a leading role in the struggle for liberation of her country and was one of the leaders of the historic Women’s march to the Union Buildings in Pretoria on 9 August 1956 alongside Lillian Ngoyi, Sophie de Bruyn, Helen Joseph and Rahima Moosa, among others who took part in that march

Although some people may be quick to associate her political struggle with her husband Walter Sisulu, the veteran African National Congress politician who died in 2003, mama Sisulu, as she was affectionately known, was a leader in her own right.

She spent almost half a century fighting for the liberation of South Africans, in the face of detentions, banning orders and harassment.

Like Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, whose contribution to South Africa’s fight for liberation is being celebrated today, Sisulu stepped into her role as a mother and became the suffering spouse of the imprisoned Walter Sisulu. Like Madikizela-Mandela, the struggle heroine never wavered in her convictions.

Her persecution kept the name of her husband alive as he served a life imprisonment sentence at Robben Island. Like the persecution of Madikizela-Mandela, the persecution of mama Sisulu helped to keep the struggle alive and served as a reminder of the cause of those who were sent to Robben Island.

As government celebrates the centenary of this iconic woman, it is only right that South Africans are reminded of the sacrifices that Sisulu and others made for the country to be the democracy it is today. The centenary celebrations will run for the entire year and will be marked by a series of commemorative events. This is also the year that South Africa celebrates the centenary of the life of former President Mandela.

Both Albertina Sisulu and Madiba dedicated their lives to ensuring a better and more united South Africa. The 100 year anniversary of the lives of these two remarkable people is an opportunity to recommit as a country to their principles by building the nation they envisioned when they fought for liberation.

A qualified nurse and mid-wife, Sisulu was born on 21 October 1912 in the Eastern Cape where she spent most of her childhood and attended school.

In her various public roles, she always sought to bring hope and dignity to the people and communities she served. Whether as a member of the NEC of the ANC, or as a nurse who protected those under her care, or in civic leadership roles, or as a staunch supporter of the value of education in changing lives.

Away from public life, she was the matriarch of her family, and took up the mantel of caring for her siblings. This caring attitude extended to children everywhere, and resulted in her setting up a day care centre to serve the community.

Sisulu, who was orphaned at the age of 15, took seriously the responsibility of looking after her siblings even though she was the second eldest.

Her resilience, showed up in her teens as she didn’t allow the death of her parents to break her.

Part of her political life was also about taking seriously her responsibilities. She did everything with the necessary professionalism, commitment and vigour, says granddaughter Ntsiki Sisulu.

As a woman, she fought when it was not fashionable to do so and did it with bravery and a sense of conviction that all are equal regardless of what the law states. She was an upholder of human rights at all costs, regardless of one’s colour or gender, she says.

Vuyelwa Sisulu, also her granddaughter, says even though her grandmother faced hardships early on in life, these struggles never harden her as she genuinely cared for people.

Vuyelwa grew up in Orlando, Soweto, under the care of Mama Sisulu and has nothing but fond memories of her grandma.

She was very strict but at the same time extremely loving, nurturing but also stern. When you were naughty, you would get reprimanded. She was a hugger, a kisser, a feeder, that’s how she showed us love, she says.

Both women talked about the sense of community in their grandmother’s home. They woke up to a breakfast of soft porridge that would be followed by eggs, boerewors and tomato gravy as well as buttered bread.

Ntsiki says her grandmother led by example even in the home and would wake up early mornings to do laundry and clean the house. The grandchildren also had their own chores.

Despite the scrutiny and surveillance she faced at the hands of the apartheid government, Sisulu often had an influx of people coming in and out of her house.

As of 1958, she was in and out of jail for her activism. In 1964, she was banned for five years which meant that she couldn’t attend gatherings, go near courts and educational centres. She was also sentenced to 10 years under house arrest.

Ntsiki recalls how her grandmother had watch her own son’s wedding from a distance, standing in her own gate. She was banned from participating in the simple pleasures of life.

Ma Sisulu met her husband Walter in 1941.

She was the only woman present when the African National Congress formed the ANC Youth League in 1944.

She was part of the women who organised other women against Bantu education and these groups of women became known for their stance in closing schools and found volunteers who taught the children at their homes. Their plan to have children taught at home failed because the government would not register the schools.

In addition, Sisulu played a significant role in the formation of the Federation of the South African Women in 1954 and was part of the drawing up of the Freedom Charter in 1955.

On 9 August 1956, she joined about 20 000 women who marched to the Union Buildings to protest against legislation aimed at tightening the apartheid government’s control over the movement of black women in urban areas. She was amongst the organisers of the march.

Albertina and Walter had five children together as well as two adopted children. She became the sole breadwinner of the family when her husband was sentenced to life imprisonment for planning acts of sabotage in June 1964.

Government says she will forever be remembered as a fearless leader in the struggle and a mother to the nation.

She worked tirelessly towards creating a better and more equitable South Africa. Throughout her life she worked to ensure that all people in South Africa should enjoy the benefits of freedom and democracy.

Source: South African Government News Agency

African Nations Defiant to US Aid Threat Over UN Voting

Three African nations singled out for their track record of voting against the U.S. at the United Nations say they stand by their votes � even if those choices may result in the U.S. cutting back on aid.

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley made the threat to cut aid in a written statement last week after the State Department released its annual report on U.N. voting trends by member countries.

Among the 10 countries listed on the annual State Department report that tracks U.N. voting patterns are nations that have long opposed U.S. interests, such as Iran, North Korea, Cuba, Venezuela and Syria.

This year’s list also included Burundi, South Africa and Zimbabwe.

The American people pay 22 percent of the U.N. budget � more than the next three highest donor countries combined, Haley said. In spite of this generosity, the rest of the U.N. voted with us only 31 percent of the time, a lower rate than in 2016. this is not an acceptable return on our investment.”

“President Trump wants to ensure that our foreign assistance dollars � the most generous in the world � always serve American interests, and we look forward to helping him see that the American people are no longer taken for granted,” she added.

‘We are owed that’

This transactional approach to international diplomacy has become a hallmark of the Trump administration. At the White House this week, President Donald Trump reminded Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari the United States gives Nigeria more than $1 billion in aid each year. Trump then called on Buhari to lower U.S. trade barriers, saying, We think we are owed that.

Zimbabwe’s government spokesman, George Charamba, literally laughed aloud when VOA asked him what he thought of Haley’s statement. Zimbabwe, a longtime critic of the United States and the West, already is under heavy international sanctions anyway, he added.

Once he stopped chuckling, Charamba explained why Zimbabwe so often disagrees with the United States.

Because we are Zimbabwe, he said. We never pander to the foreign policy of another power, whether it is America or any other power at all. We vote on the basis of principle.

He noted that Zimbabwe stood firm by its decision in 2017, to abstain from a U.N. vote to condemn Trump’s policy recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. The motion passed, with only nine nations — including the U.S. — voting in favor of recognizing Jerusalem as the capital.

South Africa, which says it has good relations with the United States, also has voted against the U.S. in votes on international human rights abuses, often aligning with China, Cuba, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela.

But Ndivhuwo Mabaya, spokesman for South Africa’s Department of International Relations and Cooperation, says his nation will not be swayed.

You cannot do diplomatic relations based on bribery, he told VOA. … It is the level of diplomatic relations that South Africa cannot be involved in. We, as a sovereign state, we have got positions on a number of issues. We have got our own national interests, we have our own [Southern African Development Community] and regional interests.”

Burundian officials, who have previously lashed out at U.S. attempts to cut aid over alleged human rights violations, said they could not comment Wednesday.

Mixing ‘money and diplomacy’

Analyst Jakkie Cilliers of the Pretoria-based Institute for Security Studies said Haley’s words are unlikely to go over well in countries that have long been courted by other powers, like China.

Money and diplomacy are never far apart, he told VOA. But the United States is the only country that really places this so firmly, and publicly, on the agenda � that is, that countries that do not support us in the [U.N.] General Assembly or elsewhere will not get money, or development assistance through USAID [U.S. Agency for International Development] or elsewhere.

“And this is a fairly common practice, but only the United States does this as blatantly as Nikki Haley has done. The other countries that do this are not well-known democracies. So it does not go down well in South Africa, or indeed in Africa.

The United States provides hundreds of millions of dollars in aid each year to those three African countries. It goes, among other things, toward improving HIV/AIDS prevention, economic growth, agriculture, food security, refugee assistance, education and maternal and child health.

Source: Voice of America