Daily Archives: April 26, 2019

Peter Sun Speaks at Second Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation: Build Smart Cities along the Digital Silk Road

BEIJING, April 26, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — On April 25, the Second Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation was held in Beijing. Peter Sun, chairman and CEO of Inspur Group, attended the forum and delivered a keynote speech titled Build Smart Cities along the Digital Silk Road, exchanging ideas with experts, political officials and business representatives on building smart cities along the Belt and Road.

In his speech, Peter Sun pointed out that in the past two decades, urbanization had injected a strong impetus into China’s economic development; and he had reason to believe that the construction of smart cities would provide a new driving force for the global economy. New technologies, like cloud computing, big data, 5G and AI, make smart cities possible. China has gained a vast amount of experience in building smart cities after many years of practice. And Jinan’s smart city of spring, a smart city project built by Inspur, was selected Top 10 Smart City Sample Projects in China in April 2019, setting up an example for building smart cities under the Belt and Road Initiative.

The construction of the digital silk road is not a solo project of Chinese enterprises, but part of a chorus of global companies, said Peter Sun, and building smart cities requires a teaming up of international companies. For this reason, Inspur united with IBM, Cisco, Diebold Nixdorf, Ericsson and other technological enterprises to initiate Smart City Alliance in November 2017, to promote smart city construction along the Belt and Road, focusing on smart cities, smart taxation, smart grain, smart finance and smart education.

So far, Inspur has provided informationalized services for 120 countries and regions around the globe, including Thailand Education Cloud Program, Kazakhstan Smart Railway Program, Zambia Smart Taxation Program and Curacao Smart City Program. In the future, together with more global partners, Inspur will build the digital silk road and share the results of the digital economy, Peter Sun added.

Minister Masutha authorises Inquest in respect of Apartheid Era Death in Detention

Justice and Correctional Services Minister, Advocate Michael Masutha, has today, 26 April 2019, authorized an application by the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) for the reopening of an inquest in relation to the death in detention of anti-apartheid activist Dr Neil Aggett.

Inquest proceedings are regulated by the The Inquests Act 58 of 1959. The purpose of holding an inquest is to investigate the circumstances of death apparently occurring from other than natural causes and where the prosecutor had declined to prosecute. It is therefore an inquisitorial cum investigation process.

Dr Neil Hudson Aggett was a medical doctor and trade unionist. Dr Aggett worked mainly in overcrowded hospitals in historically black townships like Soweto, Umthatha and Thembisa. While working at Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto Dr Aggett became involved in the trade union movement. He championed worker rights through his involvement with the Transvaal Branch of the African Food and Canning Workers’ Union (AFCWU).

He was detained by the apartheid Security Branch in 1981 at the notorious John Vorster police cells in Johannesburg. He was found dead under mysterious circumstances on 05 February 1982.

An inquest held at the time found that he had committed suicide and that the police were not responsible for his death. The inquest findings were met with condemnation both domestically and internationally due to the narrow approach adopted by the magistrate who excluded critical evidence depicting a pattern of sensory deprivation and torture.

The NPA requested the South African Police Service (SAPS) to initiate an investigation into the matter when representations were received from former colleagues of Dr Aggett. The SAPS investigation revealed several new facts which raise important questions about the findings of the magistrate who conducted the first inquest.

As in the case of Dr Hoosen Haffejee and Ahmed Timol, the State is committed to ensuring that perpetrators of apartheid era crimes who have not been granted amnesty by the TRC are brought to book.

Minister Masutha said, The families of apartheid era victims deserve to get answers on how their loved ones were murdered by the Security Police. Our democratic government has been magnanimous enough to give the perpetrators an opportunity to tell the truth and receive amnesty for the crimes that they have committed in the name of the evil apartheid regime. They chose to sit back and not say anything. Perhaps they hoped that their crimes would be forgotten. We as government owe it to the families of activists like Dr Aggett to get to the bottom of the circumstances under which they died as well as to ensure that their killers have their day in court.

Source: Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

Minister Masutha authorises Inquest in respect of Apartheid Era Death in Detention

Justice and Correctional Services Minister, Advocate Michael Masutha, has today, 26 April 2019, authorized an application by the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) for the reopening of an inquest in relation to the death in detention of anti-apartheid activist Dr Neil Aggett.

Inquest proceedings are regulated by the The Inquests Act 58 of 1959. The purpose of holding an inquest is to investigate the circumstances of death apparently occurring from other than natural causes and where the prosecutor had declined to prosecute. It is therefore an inquisitorial cum investigation process.

Dr Neil Hudson Aggett was a medical doctor and trade unionist. Dr Aggett worked mainly in overcrowded hospitals in historically black townships like Soweto, Umthatha and Thembisa. While working at Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto Dr Aggett became involved in the trade union movement. He championed worker rights through his involvement with the Transvaal Branch of the African Food and Canning Workers’ Union (AFCWU).

He was detained by the apartheid Security Branch in 1981 at the notorious John Vorster police cells in Johannesburg. He was found dead under mysterious circumstances on 05 February 1982.

An inquest held at the time found that he had committed suicide and that the police were not responsible for his death. The inquest findings were met with condemnation both domestically and internationally due to the narrow approach adopted by the magistrate who excluded critical evidence depicting a pattern of sensory deprivation and torture.

The NPA requested the South African Police Service (SAPS) to initiate an investigation into the matter when representations were received from former colleagues of Dr Aggett. The SAPS investigation revealed several new facts which raise important questions about the findings of the magistrate who conducted the first inquest.

As in the case of Dr Hoosen Haffejee and Ahmed Timol, the State is committed to ensuring that perpetrators of apartheid era crimes who have not been granted amnesty by the TRC are brought to book.

Minister Masutha said, The families of apartheid era victims deserve to get answers on how their loved ones were murdered by the Security Police. Our democratic government has been magnanimous enough to give the perpetrators an opportunity to tell the truth and receive amnesty for the crimes that they have committed in the name of the evil apartheid regime. They chose to sit back and not say anything. Perhaps they hoped that their crimes would be forgotten. We as government owe it to the families of activists like Dr Aggett to get to the bottom of the circumstances under which they died as well as to ensure that their killers have their day in court.

Source: Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

Yemen Detains More Than 2,000 African Migrants

Authorities in Yemen have rounded up and detained more than 2,000 migrants, predominantly Ethiopians, according to the U.N. migration agency.

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) is deeply concerned about the conditions in which these migrants, including 400 children, are being held, said U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric.

He said the United Nations was talking with Yemeni authorities to ensure the migrants receive basic health care, food, water and sanitation and was urging local authorities to find safer alternatives to detention.

The IOM said the detentions began Sunday in the south of the country, which is under the control of the internationally recognized government backed by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

Thousands of migrants arrive in Yemen each year, mostly from the Horn of Africa. Most of them use the country as a route to richer Gulf nations.

Earlier this week, a U.N.-commissioned report said the war in Yemen had set back development in the country by more than 20 years.

A Saudi-led coalition has been battling Yemen’s Iran-aligned Houthi rebels since 2015. The conflict has caused the deaths of tens of thousands of people.

Source: Voice of America