Category Archives: Others

Minister Mkhize to brief on registration process

The Minister of Higher Education and Training, Professor Hlengiwe Mkhize, will brief the media on the 2018 tertiary registration process.

The briefing, to be held at the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) headquarters in Tshwane at 11am, will come just a few hours before Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga announces the pass rate for the matric class of 2017.

The briefing will be broadcast live on SABC 1 at 6pm and will be preceded by a technical briefing at 4pm.

Individual results for matric learners will be made available on Friday, 5 January at the school or centre where they wrote their exams. Their partial results will be made available on the department's website.

A total of 634 527 full-time and 168 109 part-time candidates were registered to write the exams.

Source: South African Government News Agency

Nongoma SAPS seek missing girl

Nongoma police would like to make an appeal to the members of the community regarding a missing child, Aneliswa Mavimbela, 19-months-old, from Bhanganomo area, Nongoma.

It is alleged on 30 December 2017, the children were playing inside the homestead when the grandmother fell asleep. When she woke up, she noticed that Aneliswa went missing and the child she was playing with just pointed down the road. She was last seen wearing a lime coloured dress and pink sandals.

Source: South African Police Service

JAIL TERM WITHOUT OPTION OF A FINE PROPOSED FOR HUMAN TRAFFICKERS

WINDHOEK, Margaret Mensah-Williams, the Chairperson of Namibia's National Council, the upper chamber of the country's Parliament, has proposed that fines should not be an option for those found guilty of human trafficking and that they should instead receive lengthy prison sentences.

Mensah-Williams made the proposal during a continuation of the debate on the Combating of Trafficking in Persons Bill of 2017 during an urgent session of the National Council here Tuesday. She said fines would not curb human trafficking as offenders made billions of dollars and could easily pay any fine imposed.

Mensah-Williams said human trafficking traumatised victims and should not be taken lightly. "We should get rid of penalties, we are taking this thing too lightly. Where is our conscience, are human lives so worthless"? she asked.

Mensah-Williams added that human trafficking existed in Namibia. "We should stop trying to defend our country as if it will look bad if we acknowledge it. Our country will in fact look bad if we do not acknowledge it and make laws to protect people," she said.

Parliamentarian Rosa Kavara pointed out that women and children in the rural areas were the most vulnerable to trafficking.

She proposed that the Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare embark on community outreach programmes to educate people, saying that many people do not know when they are committing the offence.

The Bill, which was tabled in the National Council last month, proposes a fine not exceeding one million namibian dollars (about 78,400 US dollars) or imprisonment for a period not exceeding 30 years or both for a person convicted of trafficking.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

WORK BEGINS ON 200-KM TANZANIAN HIGHWAY LINKING ARUSHA AND MUSOMA

ARUSHA, TANZANIA, Work on the 200-kilometre highway linking this city in northern Tanzania with the town of Musoma, on the shores of Lake Victoria in northeastern Tanzania has begun with construction to first begin on the 49-km first phase from Mto-wa-Mbu to Sale, near the Arusha end.

The construction of the highway was among issues that were discussed during the Regional (Provincial) Road Board Meeting held at the Arusha Regional Headquarters, where it was explained that the first phase will cost 87 billion Tanzanian shillings (about 38.8 million US dollars), withe the whole project to be completed by 2020.

The contractor, China Wu Yi Company Limited, is expected to undertake the task over the next 24 months from now, said the Regional Manager of the Tanzania Road Networks Agency (TANROADS), Jonny De Kalupale.

All the workers' camps and operating bases have been set up, and at the moment the Chinese firm is waiting for machinery and other construction facilities to be cleared through Dar-es-Salaam Port, he disclosed, adding that the contractor would start with the first 49 km.

The distance from Arusha to Loliondo is 362 kilometres, but since the construction of the road to Wasso starts at Kigongo-Inn junction at Mtowa-Mbu, the work will cover a 215 kilometres stretch in total. The proposed tarmac road is described as being of high economic and social benefit to residents of Arusha and Mara Regions.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

Minister of Foreign Affairs Nikos Kotzias to attend a meeting of the ...

The Minister of Foreign Affairs, Nikos Kotzias, will be in Brussels on Monday, 11 December, to participate in a meeting of the EU Foreign Affairs Council.

Following a relevant request from the Greek Minister of Foreign Affairs, discussion will focus on the latest developments in Iraq and in the autonomous region of Kurdistan. Mr. Kotzias will also take part in the joint session of Foreign Affairs and Development Cooperation Ministers, which will focus on issues related to the Sahel region, and an assessment of the recent EU-African Union Summit Meeting will also be carried out.

Finally, the Minister of Foreign Affairs will attend a working breakfast of the EU Ministers of Foreign Affairs with the Prime Minister of Israel, Mr. Netanyahu, on EU-Israel relations and the latest developments in the Middle East.

Source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Hellenic Republic

PRETORIA APPROVES GRADUATE RECRUITMENT SCHEME

PRETORIA, South Africa's Cabinet has approved the Public Service Graduate Recruitment Scheme Framework, which forms part of a development programme within the public service to attract talented graduates.

The framework includes earmarking a percentage of each department's vacant posts for the recruitment of graduates in scarce occupations, Communications Minister Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane told a post-Cabinet media briefing Thursday.

The Minister of Public Service and Administration is expected to align this framework to the Youth Employment Service Programme, which aims to empower one million unemployed youth over the next three years by offering them quality work experience.

At its meeting, the Cabinet has approved four Bills -- Social Assistance Amendment Bill of 2017, Property Practitioners Bill of 2017, National Qualifications Framework Amendment Bill of 2016 and International Crimes Bill of 2017, for submission to Parliament.

The Social Assistance Amendment Bill provides improved benefits with respect to child support grants for orphaned and vulnerable children, including those residing in child-headed households.

The Property Practitioners Bill repeals the current Estate Agency Affairs Act, 1976 (Act 112 of 1976). It creates an enabling regulatory environment to enhance economic activity within the real estate industry while also addressing a need to ensure transformation in the sector.

The National Qualifications Framework Amendment Bill strengthens the current National Qualifications Framework Act, 2008 (Act 67 of 2008). It introduces measures to deal with issues of misrepresentation and imposes consequences on persons, who misrepresent their qualifications or organisations that issue qualifications that are invalid.

The International Crimes Bill provides an improved legislative framework to deal with international crimes committed in South Africa and across borders. It also provides improved protection and justice for victims of international crimes.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

Rare Skeleton Shown of Human Ancestor, 3.6 Million Years Old

JOHANNESBURG Researchers in South Africa have unveiled what they call "by far the most complete skeleton of a human ancestor older than 1.5 million years ever found."

The University of the Witwatersrand displayed the virtually complete Australopithecus fossil on Wednesday.

The skeleton dates back 3.6 million years. Its discovery is expected to help researchers better understand the human ancestor's appearance and movement.

The researchers say it has taken 20 years to excavate, clean, reconstruct and analyze the fragile skeleton.

The skeleton, dubbed Little Foot, was discovered in the Sterkfontein caves, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northwest of Johannesburg when small foot bones were found in rock blasted by miners.

Professor Ron Clarke and his assistants found the fossils and spent years to excavate, clean, analyze and reconstruct the skeleton.

The discovery is a source of pride for Africans, said Robert Blumenschine, chief scientist with the organization that funded the excavation, the Paleontological Scientific Trust (PAST).

"Not only is Africa the storehouse of the ancient fossil heritage for people the world over, it was also the wellspring of everything that makes us human, including our technological prowess, our artistic ability and our supreme intellect," said Blumenschine.

Adam Habib, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Witswatersrand, hailed the assembly of the full skeleton.

"This is a landmark achievement for the global scientific community and South Africa's heritage," said Habib. "It is through important discoveries like Little Foot that we obtain a glimpse into our past which helps us to better understand our common humanity."

Source: Voice of America

Rare Skeleton Shown of Human Ancestor, 3.6 Million Years Old

JOHANNESBURG Researchers in South Africa have unveiled what they call "by far the most complete skeleton of a human ancestor older than 1.5 million years ever found."

The University of the Witwatersrand displayed the virtually complete Australopithecus fossil on Wednesday.

The skeleton dates back 3.6 million years. Its discovery is expected to help researchers better understand the human ancestor's appearance and movement.

The researchers say it has taken 20 years to excavate, clean, reconstruct and analyze the fragile skeleton.

The skeleton, dubbed Little Foot, was discovered in the Sterkfontein caves, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northwest of Johannesburg when small foot bones were found in rock blasted by miners.

Professor Ron Clarke and his assistants found the fossils and spent years to excavate, clean, analyze and reconstruct the skeleton.

The discovery is a source of pride for Africans, said Robert Blumenschine, chief scientist with the organization that funded the excavation, the Paleontological Scientific Trust (PAST).

"Not only is Africa the storehouse of the ancient fossil heritage for people the world over, it was also the wellspring of everything that makes us human, including our technological prowess, our artistic ability and our supreme intellect," said Blumenschine.

Adam Habib, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Witswatersrand, hailed the assembly of the full skeleton.

"This is a landmark achievement for the global scientific community and South Africa's heritage," said Habib. "It is through important discoveries like Little Foot that we obtain a glimpse into our past which helps us to better understand our common humanity."

Source: Voice of America